Dr Nick Owen MBE PLUS

Working in and on the Business of Cultural Education

Day 31 of the 26 Day Big Shut Up: Joe Orton meets Richard Rawlins. Discuss.

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Heading off back town-wards, the exertions of the afternoon are taking their toll and the group starts to straggle out along the pavements and roadsides, slowly pulling us apart.  Traffic lights and zebra crossings don’t help the group cohesion and before too long we’re taking up a lot of pavement space in our Journey of Discovery towards the next Globe Sculpture by Richard Rawlins (theme: A Complex Triangle Indeed).

Located in Orton Square which is bordered by Curve Theatre, Leicester Athena, St George’s Church  and the Exchange Building (Leicester’s very own answer to New York’s Flat Iron building), Rawlin’s work is a sculpture which pulls you up sharply with its combination of direct text and images.  If you’ve ever caught yourself saying ‘these things aren’t black and white’ this sculpture and its texts insist that on the contrary, things are very much black and white – and shades of grey too.

Imagine a conversation between Orton and Rawlins taking place in the Exchange Buildings. Orton might start with this from Loot:

Truscott:          Why aren’t you both at the funeral? I thought you were mourners.

Fay:                 We decided not to go. We were afraid we might break down.

Truscott:          That’s a selfish attitude to take. The dead can’t bury themselves, you know.

Rawlins:          ….

The Mighty Creatives staff team took part in the Mighty (UN)Mute, a day-long vow of silence, on 5th October 2022. You can check out the campaign here or donate your support to it here.

Or if neither of these is possible (and heaven knows we’re all in tough financial times right now), then anything you can do to share and shout about the campaign would be equally welcomed and appreciated.

Author: drnicko

Awarded an MBE for services to arts-based businesses, I am passionate about generating inspiring, socially engaging, creative practice within educational contexts both nationally and internationally.

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